Monday, March 6, 2017

Wallet (money holder) cards!

Although everyone enjoys receiving money, checks or gift cards, the store offered money enclosure cards leaves a lot to be desired. To address this a few years ago I created my own wallet (money holder) cards.  These can be made for men, women and kids depending on the papers, embellishments and color schemes used.  The technique is fairly simple and the best template is your own wallet (or someone’s close to you).  Here are examples of a man's and woman's wallet.

Man’s style wallet card:



For the exterior I started with a simple bi-fold black 4 1/4" x 5 1/2" card. I embossed two pieces of black paper with an alligator print pattern, cut them to size and adhered them to exterior of card. Next I cut out a ½” x 1” piece of gold paper, attached it to lower right corner of the front panel and added small sticker letters to create the recipient’s initials.

For the inside of the wallet cut a 2 ½” x 7 ½” piece of black paper, fold it up lengthwise ½” from the bottom and attach it across the top of the card (about two and half inches down) to create a money pocket. Next, cut out two more panels from black paper 3 ½” x 4” each. Turn one into a “driver’s license” holder by cutting it out to create a frame to hold a piece of white paper for the message. Cut out a slit 1/8” x 2 ½” about halfway down in the second panel to create a gift card holder. Attach both panels to the inside of the wallet covering the lower portion of the money pocket. Another little gold tag can be added for more initials.

Woman’s style wallet card:


For the exterior I started with a tri-fold 4 1/4" x 5 1/2" card made from embossed football pattern 12” x 12” paper. Cut back the top layer to 1 ½” to create the top flap of the wallet. For this wallet I edged the top flap with a die-cut border that I mounted on gold paper first and then cut out.  Women like "bling" so I added four rhinestones. To keep the wallet closed use two small pieces of Velcro.

For the inside of the wallet create two pockets from strips of paper for the money and gift card pockets: the money pocket is a 2 ½” x 7 ½” piece paper, folded up lengthwise ½” from the bottom, while the gift card pocket is a 1 ½” x 4 ½” piece paper also folded up lengthwise ½” from the bottom. These are attached to the center portion of the wallet. On the lower portion create a “driver’s license” holder section lined with white paper for the message.


Both these cards will hold standard US currency, standard personal checks and standard sized gift cards.  Although there is a lot of layout and cutting involved, the end results are well worth it.  These are, of course, just two possibilities, I am sure you can all come up with your own ideas and designs. Think of all the fun you can have for kids! The nice thing about these wallet cards is they can be “re-gifted” by simply taking out the white inset on the inside of the card and replacing it with a new one (as well as the money, check or gift card of course!). 

Friday, January 20, 2017

Mirror Stamping.

A number of people have asked me about the articles I wrote over the years ... especially those about stamping techniques. I decided to repeat some here on my blog. The technique/article I want to start with is the one on "mirror' stamping.

Like the name implies, the idea is to create the illusion that the image is “mirrored” or “reflected”. The important part to the technique is to remember that when objects are “mirrored” or “reflected” they appear reversed, upside down and lighter. Although it sounds complicated it’s very do-able with the right tools and all you need is a sheet of rubber available at most home improvement store’s plumbing department. Actually you can also purchase a rubber stamp with no image that is used for this purpose; however, I found the size and the cost prohibitive. I would also recommend using a stamp positioning tool (I use a Stamp-a-ma-jig) unless you feel confident enough with your visual alignment skills.  To demonstrate the technique I chose two simple cards: one with a single mirrored image and a second with two mirrored images. There are, of course, many more ways to use this technique.



Lighthouse Card (single mirrored image)

Step 1: Lay the rubber pad down flat on your work surface and stamp the lighthouse (Inkadinkado) in grey ink aligning the bottom of the stamp with the bottom of the rubber pad.  I used grey to keep the mirrored lighthouse lighter than the direct stamped lighthouse.
Step 2: Lay the background paper over the stamped lighthouse face down (making sure that there is enough room for the rest of the stamping) and rub the back of the paper to transfer the inked lighthouse.  Peal back the paper carefully so as not to smear the ink, set it aside and let the ink dry completely before continuing.
Step 3: While the ink is drying clean the rubber pad with soap and water or with the same product you use to clean your rubber stamps.
Step 4: When the ink is dry, turn the paper around so that the stamped lighthouse is upside down and using a position tool direct stamp the lighthouse in black ink slightly overlapping the bottom edges and again set aside and let the ink dry.
Step 5: When the ink has dried, color the design.

To finish the lighthouse card, I trimmed the stamped panel so that the water line is centered on the card; I then edged the stamped panel with light blue ink and mounted the finished panel on a dark blue paper; which I trimmed 1/8” larger than the stamped panel and mounted them on a white card.  The text I used is a sticker, but obviously a stamped text can be used as well. 






Deer at Rest Card (double mirrored image)

Step 1: Lay the rubber pad down flat on your work surface and stamp the deer (Stampin’ Up!) with brown ink on the rubber pad aligning the bottom of the stamp with the bottom of the rubber pad.
Step 2: Lay the background paper over the stamped deer face down (making sure that there is enough room for the rest of the stamping) and rub the back of the paper to transfer the inked lighthouse.  Peal back the paper carefully so as not to smear the ink, set it aside and let the ink dry completely before continuing.
Step 3: While the ink is drying clean the rubber pad with soap and water or with the same product you use to clean your rubber stamps.
Step 4: Lay the background paper face up on your work surface (the deer should be upside down) and lightly draw a pencil line extending to the left from the bottom of the deer image (which is now the top).  Make a small pencil mark above the pencil line marking where the deer image ends on the left side.
Step 5: Place the tree image (Stampin’ Up!) stamp face up on your work surface and align one edge of the rubber pad along the stamp’s edge and mark the length of the image with two pencil marks.  Transfer/extend the marks so that they are visible on the back side of the rubber pad.
Step 6: Lay the rubber pad down flat on your work surface with the marked edge on the bottom and stamp the tree image in brown ink between the pencil marks along the edge of the rubber pad.
Step 7: Carefully rotate the rubber pad and align the edge of the stamped portion of the rubber mat to the underside of the line you drew and aligning the right pencil mark on the back of the rubber pad to the left one at the end of the deer, lay down the rubber pad and rub the back to transfer the image to the paper.  If everything worked out you should have a continuous image.
Step 8: When the ink is dry, turn the paper around so that the stamped deer and tree is upside down and using a position tool direct stamp the deer and tree in brown ink slightly overlapping the bottom edges and again set aside and let the ink dry.
Step 9: When the ink has dried, color the design.

To finish the deer card, I trimmed the stamped panel so that the water line is centered on the card; I then edged the stamped panel with brown ink and mounted the panel on a white card.


Saturday, January 14, 2017

Regal Deer

The second masculine themed card for the New Year is actually one I made a while ago and uses a couple of several different media. Mixing media is something I enjoy ... or maybe it's just that a card does not seem finished to me unless it has at least one sticker on it. 


I started by making a 5 1/2" x 5 1/2" card from chocolate brown paper. Next I stamped a deer image and tree from Stampin' Up! in dark brown ink (Staz-on) on a piece of wood grained patterned paper (K & Company/E.K. Success. After the stamped image dried, I cut the stamped paper down to a 5" x 5" square; which I added to the center of the card. Next I edged the stamped panel with a leafy laser cut sticker border (Mrs. Grossman's) and then edged the panel again with a mirrored copper colored line sticker (Mrs. Grossman's).

This image looks very regal, majestic but mostly masculine and is suitable to be used for a number of occasions.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

2017 New Year Resolution

Once again it's time to start a New Year ... and with fewer distractions calling on me, it will be my year to concentrate on my blog an my Face Book page! I will try to continue my masculine themed cards but also want to intermingle feminine and children themed cards. Okay, so enough chit chat and let's get started. The card I will begin 2017 with is a multi layer masculine card.


The card uses a number of items that re-enforces the masculine theme, from the blue monochromatic color scheme, the wood patterned paper, the wood plank look with nail heads and image. I started by adhering a piece of white wood grain patterned paper (My Mind's Eye) on a piece of card stock to make a more rigid background. Next I stamped a seascape with a lighthouse (Inkadinkado) in a dark blue ink (Staz-on) on background. Before using a ruler and craft knife to cut the stamped image into strips of various width, I lightly colored the image with pencils. Then using a deckle edge scissor (Fiskar) I trimmed each strip to a different length. I edged each piece with the same dark blue ink and added a small sticker (Stampendous) in black in each corner to simulate nail heads. I adhered the stamped panels with raised adhesive dots on a blue background card (Die Cut with a View) across which I ran horizontal stripe made with blue tape (Washi). I edged the card with more dark blue ink. The text is computer generated and could reflect numerous occasions or themes. 

That's it for the first 2017 blog!



Saturday, July 30, 2016

Steampunk type masculine cards.

These three cards use steampunk jewelry ... nothing new for me, I did feminine cards a few years ago using jewelry.

The first card can be used for any "love" related occasions because it holds the key to one's heart. I started with a simple size A2 card and then ran some wood patterned tape edged with copper tape. The image was stamped in sepia ink and then colored with  metallic water color. The key was silver and I colored it with permanent dark brown ink and it was surrounded by gold color rhinestones.


The second card started with an embossed clock pattern on silver paper with a stamped clock panel added at the bottom. At the top I added a sticker tag with a sticker text. The watches are again from the steampunk jewelry counter ... I added a silver chain sticker to each and the some black rhinestones.


The third card is just a fun nautical themed car starting with a white A2 card covered with a wood patterned paper. Next I create a "pirates" map by stamping a nautical image of a ship and compass; which I over stamped with a distress pattern before I embossed it with a world map image. To finish my pirate map I die cut the stamped panel with a parchment die, edged the entire panel with black ink. To finish the card I added a anchor with chain also from the steampunk jewelry aisle- note that the chain is only fastened at either end to allow some movement. Finally I added half pearl rhinestones to simulate bubbles. 


There you have my version of "steampunk" masculine cards.